children’s theater

IN THE SHADOW OF THE CROSS–A New Play coming soon

So I’ve been keeping this kind of quiet until the past couple of days but I have a new play coming out from The Script Co. titled IN THE SHADOW OF THE CROSS.

A little history about this play, while it wasn’t the first play I wrote, it’s for sure an “early work” and one I had kind of trunked for a good long while. I was ready to self publish this but then I got that sweet, sweet email that said “you’ve been accepted.”

So I’m happy to announce that I’ll SOON have another publishing credit on the resume.

I’ve seen the art work for it and it looks AMAZING and I want you to see it to. But to do that, I’m sending you on a virtual treasure hunt of sorts.

I have a plethora of social media accounts and I’ve loaded the cover art on ONE of them, so I’m sending you off to find it. Once one person finds it, likes it and/or shares it, I’ll share it with the rest of  you. Until then…happy hunting…

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Making Connections: Based On The… by Everett Robert: Interview + Giveaway

Making Connections: Based On The… by Everett Robert: Interview + Giveaway.

EVERETT ROBERT: BEING AN ACTOR HELPS MY COMMAND OF DIALOG

An Interview I did with Ognian Georgiev, a Bulgarian broadcaster, writer and blogger!

EVERETT ROBERT: BEING AN ACTOR HELPS MY COMMAND OF DIALOG.

The Life of a busy writer

I know I haven’t updated much lately and I’m hoping to change that and start updating on a regular basis, but i say that everytime I go through one of these stretches of little to no posting.

This summer was a busy theater summer for me. I performed in Hays Community Theatre’s production as “Into The Woods”, I followed that up by acting in and serving as a consultant to Phillips County Community Theatre’s production of “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: The Musical”. There is a bit of irony to this, as when both of these shows opened on Broadway the great Tom Aldredge created two roles, in “Into The Woods” he was the Narrator/Mysterious Man and in “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: The Musical” he was Muff Potter. I performed as both the Mysterious Man and Muff Potter in the two productions I was involved in. So that was a bit of irony but also a treat as Aldredge remains one of my favorite performers. The day we closed “Tom Sawyer”. I began production of the radio play I wrote and directed called “Murder AT Home” for the feature “Sherri’s Playhouse” heard on the podcast “Chatting With Sherri”. As soon as that aired, I almost immediately began writing a new radio style play of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”. I knocked out a 70 page, first draft in less than a week. I followed that up with another appearance on “Chatting With Sherri” this past Tuesday (the 23) to discuss theatre and my collection of plays, “Based on The…” (available now from Black Box Theatre Publishers).

So overall it’s been a busy time for me, I am hoping to blog a little more often, perhaps on my journey through editing, revising and hopefully producing A Christmas Carol.

Til the next blog,

Break a Leg

Autism and the Theatre

If you didn’t know, April is Autism Awareness Month. Today (April 2nd), people were encouraged to wear blue to show support for autism awareness. Over the next month, I will be highlighting autism on my blog and how the arts can affect and help autistic individuals (specifically autistic students.)

Autism affects one in 88 children today, according to Vanderbilt University researchers and theatre and theatre related activities can help in those children’s devolpment.

A recently released study assessed the effectiveness of a two-week theatre camp on children with autism spectrum disorder and found significant improvements were made in social perception, social cognition and home living skills by the end of the camp. There were also positive changes in the participants’ physiological stress and reductions in self-reported parental stress.

Called SENSE Theatre, the Social Emotional Neuroscience & Endocrinology (SENSE)program evaluates the social functioning of children with autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders.

Camp participants ages 8 to 17 years join with typically developing peers who are specially trained to serve as models for social interaction and communication, skills that are difficult for children with autism. The camp uses techniques such as role-play and improvisation and culminates in public performances of a play.

“The findings show that treatment can be delivered in an unconventional setting, and children with autism can learn from unconventional ‘interventionists’ – their typically developing peer,” said lead author Blythe Corbett, Ph.D., associate professor of Psychiatry.

Theatre and the arts is making strides in helping children on the autism spectrum and is something theatre professionals should encourage and help out with.